Well, its an Arachnoid Cyst.

Which, basically means the same as every other cyst I have ever had in my body. Nothing.

Here is the Wikipedia explanation…. But the Dr. said they just don’t have a cause and there is no treatment and no cause for worry.

So, if anyone else gets anything out of this let me know! I still have the dizziness and some numbness so I assume I am just crazy. Will soon start the intense exercising so we will see if that helps!

Classification

Arachnoid cysts can be found on the brain, or on the spine. Intracranial arachnoid cysts usually occur adjacent to the arachnoidal cistern.[4] Spinal arachnoid cysts may be extradural, intradural, or perineural and tend to present with signs and symptoms indicative of a radiculopathy.[4]

Arachnoid cysts can be relatively asymptomatic or present with insidious symptoms; for this reason, diagnosis is often delayed.

[edit] Signs and symptoms

Patients with arachnoid cysts may never show symptoms, even in some cases where the cyst is large. Therefore, while the presence of symptoms may provoke further clinical investigation, symptoms independent of further data cannot — and should not — be interpreted as evidence of a cyst’s existence, size or location.

Symptoms vary by the size and location of the cyst(s), though small cysts usually have no symptoms and are discovered only incidentally.[2] On the other hand, a number of symptoms may result from large cysts:

[edit] Location-specific symptoms

The following list of location-specific symptoms should be interpreted in the context of what they represent: results from several independent, unrelated studies. As of September 2006[update needed], no published research comprehensively maps physical and neuropsychiatric symptoms to a specific arachnoid cyst location.[10]

[edit] Causes

The exact cause of arachnoid cysts is not known. Researchers believe that most cases of arachnoid cysts are developmental malformations that arise from the unexplained splitting or tearing of the arachnoid membrane. According to the medical literature, cases of arachnoid cysts have run in families (familial cases) suggesting that a genetic predisposition may play a role in the development of arachnoid cysts in some individuals.

In some cases, arachnoid cysts occurring in the middle fossa are accompanied by underdevelopment (hypoplasia) or compression of the temporal lobe. The exact role that temporal lobe abnormalities play in the development of middle fossa arachnoid cysts is unknown.

In a few rare cases, intracranial arachnoid cysts may be inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. In recessive disorders, the condition does not appear unless a person inherits the same defective gene for the same trait from each parent. If an individual receives one normal gene and one gene for the disease, the person will be a carrier for the disease, but usually will not show symptoms. The risk of transmitting the disease to the children of a couple, both of whom are carriers for a recessive disorder, is 25 percent. Fifty percent of their children risk being carriers of the disease, but generally will not show symptoms of the disorder. Twenty-five percent of their children may receive both normal genes, one from each parent, and will be genetically normal (for that particular trait). The risk is the same for each pregnancy.

In a few rare cases, spinal intradural arachnoid cysts may be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.

Some complications of arachnoid cysts can occur when a cyst is damaged because of minor head trauma. Trauma can cause the fluid within a cyst to leak into other areas (e.g., subarachnoid space). Blood vessels on the surface of a cyst may tear and bleed into the cyst (intracystic hemorrhage), increasing its size. If a blood vessel bleeds on the outside of a cyst, a collection of blood (hematoma) may result. In the cases of intracystic hemorrhage and hematoma, the individual may have symptoms of increased pressure within the cranium and signs of compression of nearby nerve (neural) tissue.

Arachnoid cysts can also occur secondary to other disorders such as Marfan’s syndrome, arachnoiditis, or agenesis of the corpus callosum. (For more information on these disorders, choose the specific disorder name as your search term in the Rare Disease Database.)[3]

[edit] Diagnosis

Diagnosis is principally by MRI. Frequently, arachnoid cysts are incidental findings on MRI scans performed for other clinical reasons. In practice, diagnosis of symptomatic arachnoid cysts requires symptoms to be present, and many with the disorder never develop symptoms.

Additional clinical assessment tools that can be useful in evaluating a patient with arachnoid cysts include the mini-mental state examination (MMSE), a brief questionnaire-based test used to assess cognition.[10] Myelograms are contraindicated for people with arachnoid cysts.

[edit] Treatment/Management

Treatment for arachnoid cysts occurs when symptoms present themselves.[2] A variety of procedures may be used to decompress (remove pressure from) the cyst.

    • Various endoscopic techniques are proving effective,[23] including laser-assisted techniques.[24]
  • Drainage by needle aspiration or burr hole. While these procedures are relatively simple, there is a high incidence of recurrence.[citation needed]
  • Capsular resection[11]
  • Pharmacological treatments may address specific symptoms such as seizures or pain.

A 1994 study found surgery necessary for good outcome in patients >65 years old when the cysts began displaying symptoms.[25]

[edit] Prognosis

Untreated, arachnoid cysts may cause permanent severe neurological damage due to the progressive expansion of the cyst(s) or hemorrhage (bleeding).[2] With treatment most individuals with arachnoid cysts do well with the double edge sword of developing surgical arachnoiditis which can cause its own specific problems and can lead to “popping” another cyst.

More specific prognoses are listed below:

  • Patients with arachnoid cysts of the left temporal fossa who experienced impaired preoperative cognition had postoperative improvement.[26]
  • Surgery can resolve psychiatric manifestations in selected cases.[27]


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